The Role of Foster Parents in Florida

Foster parents in Florida

In an unfortunate event that happened in southwest Miami-Dade this year, a foster mother was shot in her home by the biological parents of the children in her care. The biological mother then took the children to her own home, where she was later arrested. The foster mother was shot because she refused to give the children back to their biological mother when the mother demanded them, presumably in order to protect the children. Due to the arrest record of the biological mother, who had spent time in prison for child abuse and was charged again with child neglect, the children had been put into the custody of the Department of Children and Families for their own safety and well-being.

Situations like these often leave people wondering, what rights do foster parents have?

Basics of Foster Care

Children who grow up in foster care often have tough childhoods where they have moved around between their own home and the home of foster parents, and sometimes they are placed with several different foster parents. However, the idea behind foster homes is to provide the child with a more stable and nurturing environment than what the biological parents can provide.

  1. Foster care is meant to be temporary.  It often comes to an end when the child is either adopted, reunited with his or her biological parents, or turns 18. Foster parents may initiate a termination of parental rights against the biological parents, but this is a rare situation. Usually the foster parent keeps the child until the state deems that the biological parent is fit for custody of the child.
  2. Foster parents must be emotionally and financially committed. In order to be a foster parent, a person must be completely committed to the loving care of a child that is not their own. Fostering a child is not a paid position, and all though foster parents are given a small stipend to help with food and clothing for the child, the parent must be able to financially support their own family and needs
  3. .Foster parents have to meet certain criteria. All foster parents consent to a criminal and child abuse registry check, as well as health and home inspections. They are responsible for regular communication with the caseworker assigned to the child and may be required to work with the state on the reunification visits with biological parents.
  4. Foster parents have the same responsibilities as any other parent. Foster parents do everything that biological parents do, including enroll the child in school, take the child to medical and dental appointments, and attend any meetings related to the child’s well-being or foster status. In essence, anyone who commits to being a foster parent is taking over the role of the parent of the child with all its responsibilities.

Deciding to foster a child is a big decision that should not be taken lightly. Anyone who chooses to take in a foster child should be prepared to be fully committed to the well-being of the child in his or her care. Some foster parents may choose to apply for adoption of the child in their care if that becomes an option, though it is not required, and it is not a guarantee.

If you are involved in a situation that may require children to be placed in foster care, you should contact a reliable family law attorney. There are rights and obligations on the side of the parents as well as the state, and an attorney can assist you through the process.

 

References:

Batchelor, A., Burke, P., & Anwer, S. (2018, August 31). Foster mother shot, 2 children taken from home in southwest Miami-Dade. Retrieved from https://www.local10.com/news/crime/foster-mother-shot-2-children-taken-from-home-in-southwest-miami-dade

Trudeau, J. (2010, April 08). Foster Parent Rights in Florida. Retrieved from https://www.avvo.com/legal-guides/ugc/foster-parent-rights-in-florida

 

Who Can Become A Foster Parent? (1970, September 21). Retrieved from http://www.myflfamilies.com/service-programs/foster-care/who-can-become

 

FAQ. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.familiesfirstfl.com/about-us/faq/

 

 

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About The Spatz Law Firm Blog

Russell A. Spatz, Esq. has been practicing as a Criminal Defense Lawyer in Miami Dade County for over 35 years. Having served as an Assistant State Attorney and Division Chief to two State Attorneys, Richard E. Gerstein, (1975) and Janet Reno, (1978), Russell A. Spatz, understands the complexities that are involved in defending a criminal case, and how to put his knowledge and experience to work for his clients as their criminal defense lawyer in Miami. Connect with Russell on Google.

Posted on September 10, 2018, in Family Law. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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